The Jim Crow Timeline 1926 to 1935

1926
Virginia Restricts Public Places
A Virginia law requires public halls, movie theaters, opera houses, and all other places of public entertainment to separate white patrons from black patrons.
1927
Arizona Sets Number
The Arizona legislature requires each district to vote on whether to segregate each high school in which the number of registered black students reaches 25.
1928
Kentucky Restricts Hospitals
A Kentucky law requires white and black patients to be housed in separate hospital facilities.
1930
Oregon Renews Laws
Oregon renews an anti-miscegenation statute first passed in 1866. The law prohibits any white person from marrying or residing with someone of another race.
1932
Tennessee Felonizes
In Tennessee, miscegenation is declared a felony. In addition, the legislature votes to require high schools to segregate students by race.
1932
South Carolina Restricts Adoption
The South Carolina legislature passes a law that prohibits the adoption of a white child by an African-American. (This measure will be renewed in 1952.) In addition, the legislature forbids textile manufacturing plants from permitting black and white employees to “work together within the same room, or to use the same doors of entrance and exit at the same time…or to use the same stairway and windows at the same time, or to use at any time the same lavatories, toilets, drinking water buckets, pails, cups, dippers, or glasses.”19
1932
South Carolina Restricts Circus
The South Carolina legislature requires all circuses and other traveling exhibitions to provide two separate entrances, two ticket offices, and at least two ticket takers to divide black patrons from whites.
1933
Texas Restricts Boxing
A Texas law prohibits all boxing, sparring, and wrestling matches between white and African-American competitors.
South Carolina Separates Public Places
The South Carolina legislature votes to mandate segregation in public parks, recreation centers, amusement centers, and beaches.
1935
North Carolina Restricts Books
A North Carolina law prohibits the exchange of books between white and black schools.

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